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How Behavioral Health Practices Can Prepare for Increased Demand

How Behavioral Health Practices Can Prepare for Increased Demand

posted by: Nicole Hovey date: Nov 24, 2020 category: Blog comments: Comments Off on How Behavioral Health Practices Can Prepare for Increased Demand

Demand for behavioral health services has skyrocketed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Besides fears of the virus itself, job losses and financial difficulties are increasing anxiety while social isolation from quarantine and stay-at-home orders are leading to a rise in depression symptoms. These difficulties are also leading to an increase in suicidal behaviors and substance misuse.

Additionally, behavioral health demand was already on the rise before COVID-19. PwC reported in February 2020 that a Health Care Cost Institute report on U.S. healthcare spending trends found that spending on psychiatry grew 43 percent between 2014 and 2018. Use of psychiatric services rose 32 percent between 2014 and 2018.

If you are an independent behavioral health provider, how can you prepare for and respond to this increased demand for your services? Here are a few things to consider.

Take a closer look at your practice’s infrastructure.

Are you practically able to add more clients to your practice? Not only should you consider your own limits of time and energy, but you also have the practice itself to consider. Make sure your practice’s infrastructure, such as your waiting room, office space, and any administrative staff, can handle more clients.

Will additional clients create more expenses or administrative burdens? Are your current solutions, such as billing, scheduling, and electronic health record (EHR) software, enough to help you manage these new clients? Make sure you understand how an increased client load will affect your practice.

Partner with other organizations.

For one reason or another, you may not have the availability to serve additional clients in your own practice. However, you may still be able to make a difference and help mitigate behavioral health demand through partnerships with other organizations in your community.

Reach out to other providers in both physical and behavioral health, as well as local health and social services agencies and community groups. Connecting with other professionals and related organizations can help you raise awareness of behavioral health issues, refer individuals in need to appropriate providers, and build your own professional network and knowledge.

If you don’t use telehealth, now is the time to start.

If you have not already added telehealth capabilities to your behavioral health practice, it is not too late. In fact, teletherapy use may be even higher now than in the early stages of the pandemic. Remote behavioral health options could allow you to see more clients in less time, whether you are conducting initial assessments or talk therapy appointments.

Although requirements have relaxed during COVID-19, it is still important to follow best telehealth practices. Make sure you take the appropriate steps to make sure you get reimbursed for telehealth, as well.

Consider adding a partner to your practice.

When you are the only behavioral health provider at your independent practice, there are greater limits to the services you provide and the number of clients you have. Hiring another therapist at your practice, or even bringing on a business partner, is one way to expand your capacity.

When you’re stressed and overworked, the right clinical tools are critical for helping you and your staff continue to serve clients and stay on top of your workload. BestNotes EHR solutions offer easy implementation, reduced clicks, and thorough technical support, as well as telehealth capabilities. Our software was created with clinicians in mind, helping you do what you do best. Contact us to learn more.

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