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What You Should Know About Hiring a Partner for Your Behavioral Health Practice: Part Two

What You Should Know About Hiring a Partner for Your Behavioral Health Practice: Part Two

posted by: Nicole Hovey date: Nov 19, 2020 category: Blog comments: Comments Off on What You Should Know About Hiring a Partner for Your Behavioral Health Practice: Part Two

In our previous blog post on hiring a partner for your independent behavioral health practice, we looked at how you should consider your goals for the partnership, its impact on your business, and your compensation offers.

Once you’ve decided you want to hire another therapist, or bring on another business partner, and what to offer them, here’s how to find and vet the right person.

Know where to look

Depending on the experience and credentials you want, you have different options for where to find the right candidate.

Let your professional network know you’re looking for someone to hire or join your practice.
Use online job boards, either general boards like Indeed or Linkedin, or websites specifically for behavioral health professionals, such as Therapist Job Board or Mental Health Work.
Post about the opportunity on social media, such as Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter. (Add hashtags for the city or job title to make your post more searchable.)
Reach out to local colleges and universities if you are interested in hiring a recent graduate.
Participate in job fairs or industry conferences that potential candidates may attend.
Contact local health organizations and associations about your opportunity.

Carefully consider how you market your practice in any job postings. Describe how the role will serve your clients and contribute to the organization. Make note of the benefits you offer. Describe the work environment and organizational culture, if possible.

Vet candidates carefully and thoroughly

Consider screening candidates over the phone before bringing them in for a formal interview. Critique all potential partners not only for yourself, but from your clients’ perspective. Make sure you choose someone who is not only clinically knowledgeable and trustworthy from an administrative standpoint, but who will serve clients in a compassionate, helpful way.

Before you make a formal offer, conduct a thorough background check, including their credit and criminal history. Request and follow up on references. This can take some time and money, but ultimately this step will protect your practice financially and ensure the safety of your clients.

Make sure you know the laws that apply to your practice. This means avoiding questions about an applicant’s status, such as race, religion, nationality, gender, age, or disability. Never discriminate based on those factors, whether you are hiring, managing, or firing an individual.

Negotiate with candidates appropriately

Once you find a candidate you like, it’s time to make an offer. This is when you discuss not only compensation, but your expectations. Don’t try to attract an employee by promising more than you can deliver, such as salary or vacation time.

While empathy is essential in a behavioral health job, don’t let it cloud your judgment. Don’t compromise on your non-negotiables, such as the hours you need them to work or the credentials they need to have. If the new therapist has shortcomings that can be corrected after hiring, such as obtaining a certain certification, note this in the employee contract, with a deadline for meeting the requirements.

Whatever your staffing situation, your EHR software should support your behavioral health practice’s specific needs. BestNotes EHR solutions, built specifically for behavioral health and addiction treatment providers, offer numerous customization options to help you save time, stay profitable, and make life easier for staff and clients. Contact us today to learn more, or schedule a free demo.

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